Tag Archives: adult adhd research

Let’s Talk ADHD and Genetics

The ADHD Society blog bannerDiscussing ADHD and genetics can be a daunting task, given all the technical jargon being used. Researchers are beginning to see a pattern that the hyperactivity symptoms don’t last into adulthood like inattention issues; that can plague an adult with ADD/ADHD. There are also environmental factors that affect the expression of ADHD symptoms. Children do more of what they see than what they hear. Parents who have ADD/ADHD have an important obligation to learn skills to handle their impulsiveness, inattention, distraction, and excess energy.adhd-insta2

Reports continue to be published that show the problematic nature of NOT handling ADD/ADHD in a healthy positive manner. Common to be diagnosed with a plethora of additional disorders:

  1. Anxiety, Depression, Bipolar, Tourette’s, OCD, ODD, Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, Anti-social Behaviour, Learning Disorder’s
  2. Increased likelihood of broken bones, lacerations, burns, poisoning, speeding tickets, car accidents, and jail time
  3. Increased likelihood of repeating a grade in school, dropping out entirely, unemployment, divorce, familial estrangement, and suicide
  4. 50% ADD/ADHD suffer with alcoholism /addiction

In May 2015, a long term study was completed study that “examined the genetic and environmental influences explaining interindividual differences in the developmental course of ADHD symptoms from childhood to adolescence (ie, systematic decreases or increases with age).” http://archpsyc.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2290681#Abstract

From the ages of 8-16, over 8,300 people diagnosed with ADHD from England and Wales were followed and evaluated using specific ADHD monitoring tests and scales by the parents.adhd-insta5

Basically the results were that the hyperactivity measurements went down by 50% from age 8 to 16, while the inattention measurement only decreased slightly. The researchers are proposing that 2 or more genes are responsible for the hyperactivity trait, while the inattention comes from ‘one single powerful gene’. Studies like this will help us better understand why some people have remission of certain baseline symptoms of ADD/ADHD, while others still have certain issues into adulthood.adhd-help

Dr. Etka’s viewpoint: I’m not even sure you can say a gene is more powerful than another, due to the fact that they aren’t even ‘turned on’ unless the cells are in the correct cellular environment for that gene to fully express itself. Read up on Bruce Lipton’s The Biology of Belief is a groundbreaking work in the field of new biology. Author Dr. Bruce H. Lipton is a former medical school professor and research scientist. His experiments, and those of other leading-edge scientists, have examined in great detail the mechanisms by which cells receive and process information. The implications of this research radically change our understanding of life. It shows that genes and DNA do not control our biology; that instead DNA is controlled by signals from outside the cell, including the energetic messages emanating from our positive and negative thoughts. brain-research

Add to the fact that the vast majority of humans can control their thoughts. What we can’t always control while growing up is the environment that we are placed within. As we get older and more self-sufficient, mature and responsible, than we can begin to take more control of our environments. Remember, that not everyone who has the gene for diabetes, gets overweight. Not everyone who has the gene for heart disease, develops heart problems. Open your mind to the fact that you have more control over your ADHD than you may have previously been told. I’m sure some people might get defensive about that statement, but I’m here to help you through that. COMMENT BELOW AND TELL ME HOW YOU FEEL.

If you’d like to read more about the evolving world of ADHD and genetics, here are 2 more.

  1. Faraone SV, Perlis RH, Doyle AE, et al. Molecular genetics of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Biol Psychiatry 2005; 57: 1313-1323.
  2. Sprich S, Biederman J, Crawford MH, et al. Adoptive and biological families of children and adolescents with ADHD. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2000; 39: 1432-1437.
  3. Burt SA. Rethinking environmental contributions to child and adolescent psychopathology: a meta-analysis of shared environmental influences. Psychol Bull 2009; 135: 608-637.